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dc.contributor.authorHusby, Gabriel
dc.contributor.editorHeier, Tormod
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-24T07:28:26Z
dc.date.available2016-05-24T07:28:26Z
dc.date.issued
dc.identifier.issn1894-2547
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2390086
dc.description.abstractThis comparative study examines Norway’s use of fighter jets in four military campaigns after the Cold War. Using a foreign policy analysis model that incorporates variables from several analytical levels, the study aims to explain if, to what extent, and why Norwegian authorities have used political reservations – known as national caveats – on how their troops might be used. Investigating four F-16 contributions to NATO and/or US-led missions in Kosovo, Afghanistan and Libya, the study traces the development in air power as a foreign policy tool during the period 1999 to 2011. Key findings suggest that Norway went from being a reluctant and technologically backward contributor to the air campaign in Kosovo through long-standing contributions in Afghanistan to making «an enormous difference» in Libya, according to president Obama. This development has been facilitated by a softening in Norway’s use of caveats. Judging from the analysis, there are several causes behind this development, all of which are analyzed by means of the following three factors: the alliance security dilemma (Snyder), domestic interests that determine state preferences (Moravcsik), and the bureaucratic politics model (Allison). In the post-Cold War era, Norway’s relative dependence on the Alliance has increased, as have NATO’s expectations when it comes to burden-sharing. The number of domestic constraints on the use of the military in out-of-area operations has decreased accordingly. When in government, even smaller Norwegian centrist and left-wing parties have found justification for offensive contributions. Finally, in the absence of national caveats, Norwegian officers in Libya managed the Norwegian ROEs in a responsible manner by applying soft caveats themselves.nb_NO
dc.language.isonobnb_NO
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMilitære studier;3-4/2016
dc.subjectNorgenb_NO
dc.subjectNATOnb_NO
dc.subjectluftmaktnb_NO
dc.subjectluftkrignb_NO
dc.subjectair powernb_NO
dc.subjectf-16nb_NO
dc.subjectKosovonb_NO
dc.subjectAfghanistannb_NO
dc.subjectLibyanb_NO
dc.subjectAllied Forcenb_NO
dc.subjectISAFnb_NO
dc.subjectUnified Protectornb_NO
dc.subjectkampflynb_NO
dc.subjectOdyssey Dawnnb_NO
dc.subjectEnduring Freedomnb_NO
dc.subjectRules of Engagementnb_NO
dc.subjectROEnb_NO
dc.titleNorske kampfly i krig: Bombing på klare betingelser?nb_NO
dc.typeResearch reportnb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber158nb_NO


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